Flyweight World Championship Fights & Title Claims

Full flyweight fight details from 1910 to September 2016 (plus mini fly, junior fly, junior bantam and bantam) are available in this definitive companion book:

  • For United States click HERE

  • For United Kingdom click HERE

  • For Germany click HERE

  • For Japan click HERE

Full Fight Details From 2000 Onwards

 

24 September 2018. Kosei Tanaka w pts 12 Sho Kimura.

Venue:  Takeda Teva Ocean Arena, Nagoya, Japan. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Mark Nelson.

Scorecards: 116-112, 115-113, 114-114.

18 August 2018. Cristofer Rosales w co 4 Paddy Barnes.

Venue: Windsor Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Steve Gray.

27 July 2018. Sho Kimura w co 6 Froilan Saludar.

Venue: Guosen Gym, Qingdao, China. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Chris Flores.

15 July 2018. Moruti Mthalane w pts 12 Muhammad Waseem.

Venue: Axiata Arena, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Malik Waleed.

Scorecards: 114-113, 114-113, 116-111.

17 June 2018. Artem Dalakian w rsc 8 Yodmongkol Vor Saengthep.

Venue: Parkovy Convention Centre, Kiev, Ukraine. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz Jnr.

24 February 2018. Donnie Nietes w co 7 Juan Carlos Reveco.

Venue: Inglewood Forum, Los Angeles, California, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Edward Hernandez Snr.

Nietes relinquished the IBF title on 5 April after deciding to fight at a higher weight.

 

24 February 2018. Artem Dalakian w pts 12 Brian Viloria.

Venue: Inglewood Forum, Los Angeles, California, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Lou Moret.

Scorecards: 118-109, 118-109, 118-109.

4 February 2018. Daigo Higa w co 1 Moises Fuentes.

Venue: Naha Martial Arts Stadium, Okinawa, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Len Koivisto.

On 15 April, at The Arena, Yokohama, Japan, Higa lost his WBC title on the scales prior to meeting Cristofer Rosales. The contest went ahead and a new champion was crowned after Rosales won by a ninth-round stoppage.

31 December 2017. Sho Kimura w rsc 9 Toshiyuki Igarashi.

Venue: Ota-City General Gym, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Katsuhiko Nakamura.

22 October 2017. Daigo Higa w rsc 7 Thomas Masson.

Venue: Korugikan Sumo Stadium, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Tom Taylor.

 

28 July 2017. Sho Kimura w rsc 11 Zou Shiming.

Venue: Oriental Sports Centre, Shanghai, China. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Danrex Tapdasan.

29 April 2017. Donnie Nietes w pts 12 Komgrich Nantapech.

Venue: City Waterfront Hotel & Casino, Cebu City, Cebu, Philippines. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Gerard White.

Scorecards: 117-111, 117-111, 115-113.

 

23 April 2017. Kazuto Ioka w pts 12 Noknoi Sitthiprasert.

Venue: EDION Arena, Osaka, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz Jnr.

Scorecards: 117-110, 117-110, 116-111.

Having won world titles at three different weights, Ioka handed in his WBA championship belt on 9 November to reconsider his future in boxing before announcing his retirement on 1 January 2018.

 

4 March 2017. Juan Hernandez Navarrete w rsc 3 Nawaphon Kaikanha.

Venue: National Stadium Gym, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Tom Taylor.

Hernandez Navarrete forfeited the WBC title when failing to make the weight for Daigo Higa on 20 May at the Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. The fight went ahead with Higa being crowned champion following a sixth-round stoppage victory.

 

31 December 2016. Kazuto Ioka w rsc 7 Stamp Kiatniwat.

Venue: Shimazu Arena, Kyoto, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Rafael Ramos.

5 November 2016. Zou Shiming w pts 12 Prasitsak Phaprom.

Venue: Thomas & Mack Centre, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Russell Mora.

Scorecards: 120-107, 120-107, 119-108.

 

10 September 2016. Johnriel Casimero w rsc 10 Charlie Edwards.

Venue: O2 Arena, Greenwich, London, England. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Steve Gray.

Fight Summary: Given a crack at the title after just eight contests turned out to be a bridge too far for the young Edwards (111), and although he did well, especially in the fifth when he belted the champion with a solid right cross, Casimero (111) came back with heavy shots of his own that packed more power. Realising he was way down on the cards Edwards went after Casimero in the tenth, only to be blasted to the floor by a left hook to the jaw. Although Edwards made it to his feet Casimero would not be denied and following several heavy blows hitting the target the referee came to the Englishman's rescue at 1.57 of the round.

 

Casimero relinquished the IBF title on 20 December in order to fight at 115lbs.

 

25 May 2016. Johnriel Casimero w rsc 4 Amnat Ruenroeng.

Venue: Diamond Court National Tennis Centre, Beijing, China. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Tony Weeks.

Fight Summary: In what was a return, having lost last time out to the champion, Casimero (112) exacted revenge with a fourth-round stoppage win, the end coming at 2.10 of the session. Ahead on the cards at the start of the fourth, Ruenroeng (112) was dropped by a cracking left hook after being beaten to the punch and only just beat the count. Giving the stunned Ruenroeng no time to recover, the former undefeated IBF junior flyweight title holder eventually smashed his foe to the deck with a solid left hook to the body and that was that, the referee calling it off immediately.

 

23 April 2016. Roman Gonzalez w pts 12 McWilliams Arroyo.

Venue: Inglewood Forum, Los Angeles, California, USA. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Raul Caiz. 

Scorecards: 120-108, 119-109, 119-109.

Fight Summary: Going well, his two championship belts on the line, despite putting on a master-class Gonzalez (111¼) was unable to put Arroyo (111½) away or even drop him. With a variety of punches such as jabs, hooks, uppercuts and heavy rights being thrown, 1,132 of them to be exact, one would have expected Arroyo to succumb. However, showing great character he often came back with heavy blows of his own despite being under the cosh for much of the time. Even in the 12th round when all was seemingly lost, Arroyo was still throwing leather in a valiant bid to overturn what had gone before. Having shown such resolve, Arroyo was applauded loudly at the final bell after having given it his all.

 

Gonzalez handed in his WBC and Ring title belts on 29 September after deciding to move up to junior bantam on a permanent basis.

 

7 December 2015. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 Myung-Ho Lee.

Venue: Hua Hin Centre, Hua Hin, Thailand. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Scorecards: 117-109, 117-109, 118-108.

Fight Summary: Defending his title for the fifth time, Ruenroeng (112) always seemed in control with his jab and punches off the back foot serving him well. Having hurt Lee (112) in the third with an overarm right, Ruenroeng capitalised on the challenger's predictability when picking his man off with countering blows throughout. The fight then became as much messy as it was one-sided, Ruenroeng losing a point in the ninth for excessive holding. With Lee trying to fight his way back, the final ignominy came when he was counted over in the 12th after going down from a slip.

 

17 October 2015. Roman Gonzalez w rsc 9 Brian Viloria.

Venue: Madison Square Garden, Manhattan, NYC, New York, USA. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Benjy Esteves Jnr.

Fight Summary: Although he started brightly, Viloria (111½) was soon up against it as Gonzalez (111½), his two championship belts on the line, began picking his shots with machine-like precision. Blasted to the floor in the third by a short right to the jaw, Viloria was never the same again as he was hit with everything but the kitchen sink for round after round until being rescued by the referee at 2.53 of the ninth. Still standing, having taken everything that Gonzalez had to offer, CompuBox (a stats provider for all major boxing events) showed that Viloria had been hit with more than 300 power punches.

 

26 September 2015. Juan Francisco Estrada w rsc 10 Hernan Marquez.

Venue: Convention Centre, Puerto Penasco, Sonora, Mexico. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Ramon Pena.

Fight Summary: With his two titles at stake, Estrada (112) and Marquez (112) were soon at it, the latter sending his rival stumbling in the third before being put under the hammer himself. Taking over in the fourth, Estrada quickly found his form, terrific rights to the body having his southpaw challenger over twice in the sixth. In the seventh it was more of the same as Marquez was dropped twice more from heavy lefts to the body before the ninth saw the latter pushed over for another knockdown. Having stalked Marquez from the bell in the tenth, Estrada soon had him on the floor again following a cracking left hook to the head, and when a right decked him for the seventh time in the referee stopped the fight at 1.27 of the session.

 

A day later, on 27 September, at the EDION Arena, Osaka, Japan, Kazuto Ioka retained his WBA 'second tier' title when outpointing Roberto Domingo Sosa over 12 rounds. He made a further successful defence on 31 December, stopping Juan Carlos Reveco inside 11 rounds at the EDION Arena, Osaka, Japan.

 

At the Krungthep Thonburi University, Bangkok, Thailand on 9 February 2016, Stamp Kiatniwat outpointed Gregorio Lebron over 12 rounds in defence of his WBA 'interim' title.

 

Kazuto Ioka successfully defended the WBA 'second tier' title when knocking out Keyvin Lara inside 11 rounds at the EDION Arena, Osaka, Japan on 20 July 2016.

 

When Estrada relinquished the WBA/WBO titles on 14 September 2016 to move up a weight division, Ioka was given full championship status by the WBA. Thus Ioka became a three-weight world champion on the edict, having previously been an undefeated WBA/WBC mini flyweight champion and an undefeated WBA junior flyweight title holder.

 

27 June 2015. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 Johnriel Casimero.

Venue: Hua Mark Indoor Stadium, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Larry Doggett.

Scorecards: 116-110, 115-110, 113-112.

Fight Summary: Reportedly a poor fight, the champion dropped Casimero (112) in the second round with a right-hand counter and again in seventh with a glancing right to the head. Casimero should have scored a knockdown in the third when a left hook forced Ruenroeng (111) to touch the canvas, but the referee ruled it a slip. The contest was disrupted by many throws and much clinching, Ruenroeng finally being deducted a point in the 11th for continuous holding. Ruenroeng had gone to the front with a good left jab controlling Casimero, and although the latter came on strongly in the last three sessions in a bid to close the deficit he was unable to do so.

 

16 May 2015. Roman Gonzalez w rsc 2 Edgar Sosa.

Venue: The Forum, Inglewood, California, USA. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Fight Summary: Getting away quickly in this one, the champion slammed in powerful left hooks that shook Sosa (112) up in the opening session before going to town in the second. Showing great power and ability, Gonzalez (111) did not give Sosa a moment's rest, dropping him firstly with a cracking right to the head and then with a left-right-left before another flurry of blows from both hands decked him again. The final knockdown saw the referee stop the fight at 2.37 of the session without even taking up the count.

 

28 March 2015. Juan Francisco Estrada w rsc 3 Rommel Asenjo.

Venue: Zamna Poliforum, Merida, Mexico. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Jose Rivera.

Fight Summary: Clearly a mismatch, Estrada (112) retained both of his titles when the referee stopped the contest after 43 seconds of the third on reacting to the towel being thrown in by Asenjo's corner. Estrada had been hurting Asenjo (111¾) with left hooks and heavy rights to the head and body from the start, the southpaw challenger having no answer to the bombardment, and with his right eye badly swollen it was a merciful ending. Immediately prior to the stoppage Asenjo had been dropped by a body shot, only for the third man to call it a slip.

 

On 22 April, Kazuto Ioka outpointed Juan Carlos Reveco over 12 rounds at the Prefectural Gym, Osaka, Japan, to land the latter's WBA 'second tier' title.

 

The vacant WBA 'interim' title was decided when Stamp Kiatniwat outpointed Gregorio Lebron over 12 rounds at the Open Air Stadium, Chiangkhanin, Loei Province, Thailand on 29 July.

 

7 March 2015. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 Zou Shiming.

Venue: Cotai Arena, Venetian Resort, Macao, China. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Mark Nelson.

Scorecards: 116-111, 116-111, 116-111.

Fight Summary: Despite being dropped in the second by a swinging left from Shiming (111½), a former two-time Olympic gold medallist, the champion soon got back to basics with his jab working well to pick up the points. With Shiming always on the front foot, although often off balance as Ruenroeng (112) countered well, he was largely outscored. Apart from the second, Shiming's best rounds came in the seventh, tenth and 12th, but he was unable to make any real impression on Ruenroeng, who boxed well within himself.

 

22 November 2014. Roman Gonzalez w rsc 6 Rocky Fuentes.

Venue: International Swimming Pool, Yokohama, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Len Koivisto.

Fight Summary: Right from the opening bell the challenger tried swarming tactics as a means of unsettling Gonzalez (112), who quickly settled down to pick his punches carefully, countering with lefts and rights to both head and body. Having hurt Gonzalez in the third with a heavy right to the head, Fuentes (110¾) made his move, only to run into solid combinations. With Gonzalez taking the initiative from then on Fuentes was tiring badly by the sixth as his efforts caught up with him, and after being sent to the floor by heavy blows, both up and down, the referee saved him from taking further punishment by calling the fight off even though he was showing a willingness to carry on. The stoppage was timed at 2.11 of the sixth.

 

10 September 2014. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 McWilliams Arroyo.

Venue: Liptapanlop Hall, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Pat Russell.

Scorecards: 114-113, 114-113, 113-114.

Fight Summary: In a contest that the champion was expected to win with something to spare, Arroyo (110¾) made him fight every step of the way before he retained his title by a split decision. When it became clear that Arroyo was the heavier puncher of the pair, Ruenroeng (109½) moved into countering mode as the pace quickened. In the sixth, after pushing Arroyo over, Ruenroeng was dropped by a swinging right to the head before coming back hard in the seventh. With both men tiring fast, and Ruenroeng continuously tying Arroyo up, despite the latter taking the final session on all three cards it was not quite enough for him to lift the title.

 

6 September 2014. Juan Francisco Estrada w rsc 11 Giovani Segura.

Venue: The Arena, Mexico City, Mexico. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Fight Summary: Boxing with great skill, Estrada (112), with his two championship belts on the line, outclassed the rough, tough Segura (112) to retain his titles. Right from the bell, Estrada began stabbing in long left jabs and moving away from Segura's punishing lefts, slipping the blows and countering to the body. Occasionally the pair traded, but Estrada took all that Segura had on offer. By the fifth the right side of Segura's face was badly swollen as Estrada picked his punches, and from thereon in the latter battered his southpaw opponent for round after round. In the 11th when Segura, looking a sorry sight, was smashed into a corner by a solid left hook, with Estrada all over him like a rash the referee had seen enough, stopping the fight at 1.33 of the session just as the towel was being thrown in by the challenger's corner.

 

Juan Carlos Reveco stopped the WBA 'interim' champion, Yodmongkol Vor Saengthep, in the fifth round at the Gustavo Rodriguez Municipal Sports Stadium, San Martin, Argentina on 19 December to retain his 'second tier' crown.

 

5 September 2014. Roman Gonzalez w rsc 9 Akira Yaegashi.

Venue: Yoyogi National Gym, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Michael Griffin.

Fight Summary: Having been the undefeated WBA champion at 105lbs and 108lbs, Gonzalez (111¾) added the WBC 112lbs version to his collection when stopping Yaegashi (112). At the same time he took possession of the latter's Ring Championship Belt. Always running second best, the champion made the mistake of mixing it up with Gonzalez instead of sticking to his boxing. Getting on top early on, Gonzalez dropped Yaegashi in the third with a crunching left hook, having hammered in blows from both hands, and in round after round the latter was forced to take plenty more until he was rescued by the referee at 2.24 of the ninth. The finish came after Yaegashi had been put down following a battery of blows from both hands and deemed unfit to continue.

 

7 May 2014. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 Kazuto Ioka.

Venue: Bodymaker Coliseum, Osaka, Japan. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Mark Calo-Oy.

Scorecards: 119-108, 115-112, 113-114.

Fight Summary: Displaying good speed and sharpness to match, the champion controlled much of the fight with jabs and counters that found Ioka (112) with regular monotony. Ruenroeng (112) also proved to be an elusive target, being never in one place for long, and using solid hooks and uppercuts to good effect. In the latter stages as Ruenroeng tired and had a point deducted for holding in the 11th, Ioka gave it everything he had until running out of time. Announced as a split decision, one of the judges gave Ruenroeng 11 rounds while another actually saw Ioka winning, which was difficult to countenance.

 

26 April 2014. Juan Francisco Estrada w rtd 9 Richie Mepranum.

Venue: Convention Centre, Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Celestino Ruiz.

Fight Summary: Putting his two championship belts on the line against the over-matched Mepranum (112) allowed Estrada (112) to showcase his ability in front of his home fans and proving far too good for his rival. By the sixth it was clearly apparent that Estrada's body shots were wearing down the brave Filipino southpaw, who gamely went toe-to-toe with the champion. Unfortunately his punches had little effect on Estrada, and at the end of the ninth he was wisely retired by his corner.

 

On 6 June, Juan Carlos Reveco made a successful defence of his WBA 'second tier' title when outpointing Felix Alvarado over 12 rounds at the Villa La Nata Sporting Club, Benavidez, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

 

6 April 2014. Akira Yaegashi w rsc 9 Odilon Zaleta.

Venue: Ota-City General Gym, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Ian John-Lewis.

Fight Summary: Retaining his two championship belts with a ninth-round stoppage win over Zaleta (111¾), Yaegashi (112) finally overcame the taller man. It was Yaegashi who made the running, pitting his aggression against the movement of Zaleta, who was happy to land light point-scoring jabs before backing away. Although Yaegashi shook Zaleta up in the fifth with cracking left hooks, he did not find the finisher until landing a countering right to the jaw in the ninth that saw the referee continue to count to 'ten' despite the latter being on his feet. By his action the third man had clearly decided to bring matters to a halt, the finish being timed at 2.14 of the session.

 

22 January 2014. Amnat Ruenroeng w pts 12 Rocky Fuentes.

Venue: Liptapanlop Hall, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Tony Marretta.

Scorecards: 117-111, 116-112, 116-112.

Fight Summary: Contested for the vacant title after Moruti Mthalane handed in his belt, it was the 34-year-old Ruenroeng (112) who won the day when outpointing Fuentes (112), a last minute substitute for the South African. Showing excellent hand-speed, Ruenroeng got away well to win six of the opening seven rounds before tiring. Having consistently applied pressure up until then Fuentes realised that his best chance lay in getting close, and from thereon in Ruenroeng was forced to dig deep and hold while backing off with light jabs. Afterwards, the Fuentes' camp felt that his aggressive tactics should have earned him more than the four rounds awarded him by the judges, especially in the latter stages.

 

6 December 2013. Akira Yaegashi w pts 12 Edgar Sosa.

Venue: Kokugikan Sumo Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Mark Green.

Scorecards: 116-112, 117-111, 117-111.

Fight Summary: Boxing well within himself, the holder of two championship belts was just too fast for the bustling Sosa (112), being dominant most of the way. Becoming frustrated as Yaegashi (111¾) piled up the points with solid jabs and left hooks, Sosa had some success in the ninth with good work to the body and swift combinations before carrying his efforts right through to the final bell without a payoff.

 

12 August 2013. Akira Yaegashi w pts 12 Oscar Blanquet.

Venue: Ota-City General Gym, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Len Koivisto.

Scorecards: 116-110, 116-110, 115-111.

Fight Summary: Punching out a solid points win in defence of his two championship belts Yaegashi (112) always seemed to have plenty in hand, even though he was held up in the early stages by the challenger's longer-reaching left jab. In the eighth after Yaegashi's work to the body had begun to take effect, and having been deducted a point earlier in the session for a low blow, he dropped Blanquet (112) with a straight right. Following that, Blanquet chased after Yaegashi with wide, swinging blows in an effort to close the deficit, only to be met with countering right hooks through to the final bell.

 

27 July 2013. Juan Francisco Estrada w pts 12 Milan Melindo.

Venue: Cotai Arena, Venetian Centre, Macao, SAR China. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Scorecards: 117-109, 118-109, 118-109.

Fight Summary: Controlling the pace of the contest for much of the time, his two championship belts on the line, Estrada (111½) failed to win as convincingly as those in the know thought he would. However, he did enough after having to shrug off a solid left hook from Melindo (111½) in the opener, and by the 11th was well clear before opening up with right-hand blows and flooring the latter just before the bell. With Estrada looking for the finish in the 12th he wobbled Melindo badly with another heavy right, but the Filipino held on to last the distance.

 

On 1 August, Kompayak Porpramook lost his WBA ‘interim’ title when outpointed over 12 rounds by Koki Eto at the Army 11th Regiment Arena, Bangkok, Thailand.

 

Making the third defence of his WBA ‘second tier’ title, Juan Carlos Reveco beat Ricardo Nunez on an eighth-round technical decision at the Gustavo Toro Rodriguez Sports Centre, San Martin, Mendoza, Argentina on 12 October.

 

Eto lost his WBA ‘interim’ crown when stopped in the 12th round by Yodmongkol Vor Saengthep at the City Hall Grounds, Chonburi, Thailand on 29 November. Vor Saengthep then made a successful first defence of the WBA 'interim' title when outpointing Takuya Kogawa over 12 rounds at the Suranaree Army Camp, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand on 4 March 2014.

 

Reveco made another successful defence of the WBA 'second tier' crown when stopping Manuel Vides in the second round of their contest at the Sporting Club, Villa La Nata, Benavidez, Buenos Aires, Argentina on 21 March 2014.

 

8 April 2013. Akira Yaegashi w pts 12 Toshiyuki Igarashi.

Venue: Kokugikan Sumo Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 115-110, 116-109, 117-108.

Fight Summary: With his two championship belts on the line, Igarashi (112) made a poor start against his fellow countryman, Yaegashi (111¾), when failing to use his longer southpaw reach to good effect and trying to work at close quarters. Yaegashi, a former WBA mini flyweight title holder, and Igarashi were both deducted points for head butts that resulted in cut eyes, Yaegashi in the fifth and sixth, and Igarashi in the sixth. Of the pair it was the two-belt champion who suffered the worst with cuts to both eyes that held him back at times. Eventually, it was Yaegashi's good work downstairs that gradually wore down Igarashi.

 

6 April 2013. Juan Francisco Estrada w pts 12 Brian Viloria.

Venue: Cotai Arena, Macao, China. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: Genaro Rodriguez.

Scorecards: 116-111, 117-111, 113-115.

Fight Summary: Putting both of his hard-won titles on the line, Viloria (111½) made a good start against Estrada (112) when catching him with solid uppercuts and countering blows in the opening few sessions. Having been hurt in the fifth, Estrada came on strongly in the seventh when stunning Viloria with a cracking right, and from thereon in he took the remaining rounds on the cards with right-hand countering blows paving the way. One of the judges marked the 12th as a 10-8 for Estrada despite there being no knockdowns, such was the punishment he dished out.

 

Kompayak Porpramook stopped Jean Piero Perez inside six rounds at the City Hall Gardens, Khon Kaen, Thailand on 26 April to win the vacant WBA ‘interim’ title.

 

Juan Carlos Reveco made a further successful defence of the WBA ‘second-tier’ title when stopping Ulises Lara in the eighth round of their contest at the Alvearenses Athletics Stadium, Mendoza, Argentina on 22 July.

 

17 November 2012. Brian Viloria w rsc 10 Hernan Marquez.

Venue: Sports Arena, Los Angeles, California, USA. Recognition: WBA/WBO. Referee: David Mendoza.

Fight Summary: In a unification battle between Marquez (110¾), the WBA champion, and the WBO representative, Viloria (111¾), it was the Hawaiian who came out on top with a tenth-round stoppage win. Working the body well throughout, Viloria made a solid start when dropping Marquez in the first with a countering right hook, before the latter got himself back into the contest in a rip-roaring fifth. Having gone down from a southpaw right hook to the head, which appeared to be seen as a slip by the third man, on getting up Viloria was hammered for a long spell before finding a straight right to put Marquez on the floor. Following on from that, Marquez was outboxed for several rounds until finding his feet again in the ninth when blasting away at Viloria. Stalking Viloria in the tenth, when Marquez ran into a perfect left hook the referee stopped the contest at 1.01 of the session after being prompted by the latter's corner.

 

Having been promoted from ‘interim’ to WBA ‘second tier’ champion in December, Juan Carlos Reveco retained his new title when outpointing Masayuki Kuroda over 12 rounds at the Todoroki Arena, Kawasaki, Japan on 27 February 2013.

 

3 November 2012. Toshiyuki Igarashi w pts 12 Nestor Daniel Narvaes.

Venue: Xebio Arena, Sendai, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Lupe Garcia.

Scorecards: 114-112, 114-112, 113-113.

Fight Summary: Dominating the opening seven sessions with southpaw blows to head and body Igarashi (112) looked to be well on his way to a good win, but that was before Narvaez (111½) came on strongly after the two-belt champion tired. Stalking Igarashi from the eighth onwards Narvaez began to take over, outboxing his man in four of the last five sessions. Unfortunately for him, however, he had left it just a little too late. Both men had points taken away for accidental head butts that caused cuts, Igarashi in the fourth and Narvaez in the 11th.

1 September 2012. Moruti Mthalane w rsc 8 Ricardo Nunez.

Venue: Roberto Duran Arena, Panama City, Panama. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Kenny Chevalier.

Fight Summary: Starting strongly against his mandatory challenger, Mthalane (112) put Nunez (112) down in the first with a big right to the head, and continued to work him over to the bell. Despite boxing well, Mthalane was himself dropped by a flurry of blows at the end of the third before being forced to go on the defensive for several rounds. Having been under attack for the last three sessions Mthalane began coming back into it in the seventh, and in the eighth he stormed in with heavy shots from both hands overwhelming Nunez until the referee stopped the contest on the 2.41 mark when the latter was on his way to the floor.

 

Mthalane, who was due to defend the IBF title against Amnat Ruenroeng, handed back his belt on 13 January 2014 for financial reasons. Following that, Rocky Fuentes was brought in to take on Ruenroeng for the vacant title.

 

16 July 2012. Toshiyuki Igarashi w pts 12 Sonny Boy Jaro.

Venue: Winghat Arena, Kasukabe, Saitama, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Gelasio Perez.

Scorecards: 116-112, 115-113, 112-116.

Fight Summary: Up against the lanky Igarashi (112), the two-belt champion lost his honours at the first time of asking when the split decision went against him. Having failed to make the weight on his first trip to the scales, which must have hindered him, for Jaro (112) there were no excuses. Although one of the judges had Jaro winning five of the first six rounds, by the ninth Igarashi was in control, outpunching his rival with solid southpaw combinations. However, in the 11th Jaro made a supreme effort when he almost dropped Igarashi, now cut on the left eye, with clubbing lefts and rights. Recognising that Jaro's offensive had taken a lot out of him, the younger Igarashi came back strongly in the final session to make sure the verdict went his way.

 

12 May 2012. Brian Viloria w rsc 9 Omar Nino.

Venue: Ynares Sports Arena, Pasig City, Manila, Philippines. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Mike Ortega.

Fight Summary: Having lost his WBC junior flyweight title to Nino back 2006, Viloria wiped the slate clean when defeating the same opponent in defence of his WBO flyweight crown. In charge all of the way despite a slow start, Viloria (112), known as 'The Hawaiian Punch', picked it up in the fourth when looking to finish his rival off. Deducted a point for low blows in the fifth, Nino (112), carrying a badly cut left eye, was right up against it. Although he made a big effort to get into the contest, on being sent back on his heels from a solid right in the ninth the referee stopped the fight on the 2.07 mark.

 

2 March 2012. Sonny Boy Jaro w rsc 6 Pongsaklek Wonjongkam.

Venue: Makeshift Arena, Chonburi, Thailand. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Yuji Fukuchi.

Fight Summary: It did not start well for the two-championship belt holder, Wonjongkam (112), who slipped over in the first round due to the rain-soaked canvas following a left hook to the head. Things then got decidedly worse for him when a right cross from Jaro (112) dropped him again in the fourth after he had been down earlier in the round without a count being given. Although Wonjongkam was firing back, Jaro, slipping and sliding around, seemed impervious to the southpaw shots coming his way, and in the sixth two big overarm rights blasted the champion to the floor. After getting up and being punched around the ring, when Wonjongkam finally went down again the referee called the fight off at 1.39 of the session. Earlier, in the sixth, Jaro had been deducted a point for low blows.

 

23 December 2011. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam tdraw 1 Hirofumi Mukai.

Venue: 11th Infantry Regiment Arena, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Guido Cavallieri.

Fight Summary: With Wonjongkam (112) defending his two championship belts, the match was called off after just 47 seconds of action when Mukai (112) was badly gashed over his right eye from a coming together of heads. WBC rules stated that if a fight ended through injury prior to the fifth round it should be classified as a technical draw. Mukai had only participated in six pro contests prior to this, having lost his last one to Rocky Fuentes.

 

11 December 2011. Brian Viloria w rsc 8 Giovani Segura.

Venue: Ynares Sports Centre, Pasig City, Philippines. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Samuel Viruet.

Fight Summary: Taking a risk in defending his title against the hard-hitting Segura (112) did not worry Viloria (112), despite him being under attack in the opening round from heavy southpaw uppercuts and body shots. By the second Viloria had got himself into the fight, cutting Segura on the right eye and countering well with left hooks as the latter came on to him. Picking it up as the rounds continued, Viloria had cut Segura up significantly by the sixth, the latter's right eye almost shut and his face a sea of blood. Prior to the eighth the referee warned Segura that he had little time left, and after he was staggered by Viloria the fight was called off 29 seconds into the session.

 

29 October 2011. Hernan Marquez w rsc 1 Luis Concepcion.

Venue: Multiple Uses Centre, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Rafael Ramos.

Fight Summary: In a return match, with both men going for it at the opening bell it was the champion who struck first when sending the oncoming Concepcion (112) crashing from a big southpaw left. Although Concepcion got to his feet, continuing to show the lack of defensive skills required in favour of going toe-to-toe he was again dropped, this time by a heavy right. Back in action, Concepcion was promptly sent down when a big Marquez (112) left hand connected with his jaw. With Concepcion down for the third time in a round under WBA rules the contest was over after just 109 seconds.

 

Juan Carlos Reveco made a successful defence of his WBA ‘interim’ title when outscoring Karim Guerfi over 12 rounds at the Orfeo Super Dome, Cordoba, Argentina on 11 May 2012. Another successful defence of the WBA ‘interim’ title saw Reveco outpoint Julian Rivera at the Municipal Sports Centre, Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina on 10 November 2012.

 

28 October 2011. Moruti Mthalane w rsc 7 Andrea Sarritzu.

Venue: PalaRockefeller, Cagliari, Italy. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Wayne Kelly.

Fight Summary: On top right from the start, Mthalane (111) quickly cut the ring down to size when forcing Sarritzu (111) to work hard just to keep him at bay. Lacking the power required to halt Mthalane's forward march, the challenger was really up against it when his body became the focal point of attack in the fourth and, although he continued with much bravery as the punches came in, the seventh would see the end of the contest. Caught by two heavy body shots, when Sarritzu turned away and the towel was thrown in, the referee stopped the contest at 1.57 of the session.

 

21 October 2011. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Edgar Sosa.

Venue: 11th Infantry Regiment Arena, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Massimo Barrovecchio.

Scorecards: 116-111, 117-110, 117-110.

Fight Summary: Defending his two championship belts, the 34-year-old Wonjongkam (112) once again proved too good for a younger challenger when meeting fire with fire. Whenever Sosa (112) put good punches together Wonjongkam would come back strongly, his quality southpaw shots being both hurtful and accurate. Although Wonjongkam was deducted a point in the ninth for an accidental head butt that left Sosa nursing a cut right eye it barely made a difference.

 

16 July 2011. Brian Viloria w pts 12 Julio Cesar Miranda.

Venue: Blaisdell Arena, Honolulu, Hawaii. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Scorecards: 117-110, 114-113, 115-113.

Fight Summary: Having sent Miranda (111¾) to the deck in the opening session with a hard right to the body, Viloria (111¾) concentrated on that area from thereon in prior to winning the title by a unanimous decision. It was always relatively close, the champion fighting back as the action went first one way and then the other. Winning the last three rounds on the cards as he began his fightback, Miranda was throwing excellent combinations against the single shots coming from Viloria, a former IBF/WBC junior flyweight title holder, but it was the latter's good early work that won it for him.

 

2 July 2011. Hernan Marquez w rsc 3 Edrin Dapudong.

Venue: Multiple Uses Centre, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz Jnr.

Fight Summary: Moving in on Dapudong (112) from the start it was quickly apparent that the champion could hurt the latter as he sent him reeling around the ring from heavy southpaw punches. It was very much the same in the second, and after Dapudong had been downed by a solid left hook in the third he intimated to the referee that he did not wish to continue despite getting to his feet. Announced as a referee's stoppage at 1.49 of the session, Marquez (112) had just too much heavy artillery for Dapudong to cope with.

 

1 July 2011. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Takuya Kogawa.

Venue: Public Arena, Hat Yai, Thailand. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Lou Moret.

Scorecards: 118-110, 117-111, 116-112.

Fight Summary: His two championship belts on the line, the champion proved to be too good for Kogawa (111½) who despite boxing well lacked the power to walk off with a win. Although Kogawa was faster than Wonjongkam (112) and rarely stopped throwing punches, he was kept at bay by solid southpaw counters and left hooks that often rocked him. Both men finished the contest with cuts above their right eyes caused by unintentional head butts.

 

2 April 2011. Hernan Marquez w rsc 10 Luis Concepcion.

Venue: Roberto Duran Arena, Panama City, Panama. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Luis Pabon.

Fight Summary: Making the first defence of the title that was handed to him after it was relinquished by Daiki Kameda, Concepcion (112) made a great start in what was a tumultuous opening round, dropping Marquez (112) heavily with a cracking southpaw right to the chin and almost putting him out of the fight. That was immediately prior to Concepcion being smashed down by a heavy left moments before the bell. After going toe-to-toe in the second a regrouped Marquez had Concepcion over in the third from a countering left and chased his man down, almost having him over again from a battery of blows. It was still hammer and tongs from the fourth through to the sixth before the next two rounds saw both men taking a breather. Although Concepcion came back hard in the ninth, Marquez, by now getting on top, sent him down in the tenth with another big right. After struggling through to the end of the session, the referee was asked to stop the fight by the ringside doctor who had examined Concepcion fully and felt that he should not be allowed to continue.

 

At the Vicente Polimeni Stadium, Las Heras, Mendoza, Argentina on 10 June, Jean Piero Perez lost his WBA ‘interim’ title when knocked out inside two rounds by Juan Carlos Reveco.

 

26 March 2011. Moruti Mthalane w rsc 5 Johnriel Casimero.

Venue: Nasrec Indoor Arena, Johannesburg, South Africa. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Earl Morton.

Fight Summary: Although dropping the opening round the champion was soon in top gear, two-fistedly chasing Casimero (111½) around the ring and handing out a steady beating. By the fifth it was clear that Casimero had little left, and under attack from Mthalane (112) he was rescued by the referee at 1.50 of the session after he had raised his arms in surrender.

 

26 February 2011. Julio Cesar Miranda w rsc 4 Ardin Diale.

Venue: Corregidora Terrace Stadium, Queretaro, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Genaro Rodriguez.

Fight Summary: Starting well, the challenger had Miranda (112) on the floor in the opening round from a solid right to the head before the latter found his feet. Getting into his stride in the second, Miranda pushed Diale (111½) over in the third before taking his man apart with two knockdowns in the fourth, the right hand doing the damage. The first came from a blow to the head, and the second was a body punch that saw the exhausted Diale sink to the canvas before partly getting up and being rescued by the referee at 1.29 of the session.

 

26 December 2010. Daiki Kameda w pts 12 Silvio Olteanu.

Venue: Super Arena, Saitama, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Pinit Prayadsab.

Scorecards: 116-112, 115-113, 110-118.

Fight Summary: Kameda (112) somehow held on to his title by a split decision despite Joe Koizumi, the leading boxing reporter in Japan, agreeing with the judge who saw Olteanu (112) win ten of the 12 contested rounds. The much smaller but busier Olteanu landed by far the most punches, whilst Kameda threw single shots. Kameda, who showed a bit of form in the eighth and ninth, stated after the contest that his weight-making problems had been the cause of his poor display.

 

When Kameda relinquished the title on 4 January 2011 to move up a weight, Luis Concepcion, the WBA ‘interim’ champion, was elevated to full championship status.

 

On 29 January 2011, Jean Piero Perez took over the WBA ‘interim’ title when outpointing Jesus Jimenez over 12 rounds at the Medrano 67 Coliseum Arena, Guadalajara, Mexico.

 

16 October 2010. Julio Cesar Miranda w rsc 2 Michael Arango.

Venue: Baseball Stadium, Monterrey, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Russell Mora.

Fight Summary: Having carried the opening round as his cautious challenger moved around on the back foot, Miranda (112) picked it up in the second when looking for an early night. For his part Arango (112) had not come to lie down, and he landed several solid blows as the pair punched it out before Miranda found a terrific right to the head that sent his rival staggering into the ropes. Recognising that Arango was in some distress, despite him remaining upright, the referee stopped the fight at 1.30 of the session.

 

8 October 2010. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Suriyan Sor Rungvisai.

Venue: Open Air Arena, Nonghai, Srisaket, Thailand. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 114-113, 115-112, 115-114.

Fight Summary: With Wonjongkam's WBC title and Ring Championship Belt on the line, he was given a tough time of it by the relatively inexperienced Sor Rungvisai (112), also known as Por Chokchai, before retaining his title. The fight flowed back and forth with neither man in the ascendancy for long, Sor Rungvisai showing with solid left hooks as the southpaw champion bashed away with straight right-lefts. Both men were hurt on occasion, but neither backed down. In the eighth Sor Rungvisai was docked a point for an accidental head butt that left Wonjongkam (112) with a cut left eye, while the tenth saw a tremendous attacking display from both fighters before the challenger went for broke to no avail in the final session.

 

25 September 2010. Daiki Kameda w pts 12 Takefumi Sakata.

Venue: Big Sight Arena, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Stan Christodoulou.

Scorecards: 118-110, 116-112, 117-112.

Fight Summary: Winning virtually every round bar the second, fourth and seventh, Kameda (112) took a clear points decision off the shorter Sakata (112) who lacked the power to turn the contest round. Almost over from a solid left hook at the end of the third, Sakata ended the session with a cut over his right eye following a coming together of heads. By the end of the seventh Sakata appeared to have run out of steam, and taking full advantage of his opportunity Kameda picked up the last five rounds to go well clear of his rival despite having had to take off 20lbs in the previous week.

 

4 September 2010. Julio Cesar Miranda w rtd 8 Ronald Ramos.

Venue: Solidaridad Arena, Monterrey, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Fight Summary: Making his first defence, Miranda (112) was far too good for his southpaw challenger. Dropped in the opening session, Ramos (112) suffered severe body attacks for much of the time as Miranda (112) stalked him, banging in blows to the soft target area. Although Ramos was a difficult man to pin down, resisting many of Miranda's efforts to get him out of the contest, he took such a battering in the eighth that his corner retired him at the end of the session.

 

1 September 2010. Moruti Mthalane w rsc 5 Zolani Tete.

Venue: Carnival City Arena, Brakpan, Gauteng, South Africa. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Tonio Tiberi.

Fight Summary: Defending his title in an all-South African affair, Mthalane (112) proved far too strong for his lanky southpaw challenger. Fairly even coming into the fourth, Mthalane finally caught up with Tete (112), blasting him with punches up to the bell. The fifth round saw Tete succumb to Mthalane's extra power when he was dropped twice from heavy head blows before being saved from taking further punishment by the referee at 2.27 of the session.

12 June 2010. Julio Cesar Miranda w rsc 5 Richie Mepranum.

Venue: Convention Centre, Puebla, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Russell Mora.

Fight Summary: Battling for the vacant title after Omar Narvaez moved up a weight, although Mepranum (112), a southpaw, had the better of the opening session it was Miranda (112) who took the honours from thereon in with solid blows to the body paving the way for victory. Following a severe body assault in the fourth, Mepranum was dropped by a solid left hook to the jaw before being rescued by the referee at 2.41 of the fifth after another savage body blast had decked him again.

 

27 March 2010. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Koki Kameda.

Venue: Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC/The Ring. Referee: Lupe Garcia.

Scorecards: 115-112, 116-112, 114-114.

Fight Summary: In a battle of southpaws, and with the vacant Ring Championship Belt at stake, Wonjongkam (111½) regained the WBC title he once held when outscoring Kameda (112) by a majority decision. Despite Wonjongkam being in control for much of the way, one of the judges actually saw the result as a draw. Wonjongkam made the better start, his accurate punches taking him to the front before he had a point taken away in the fifth when heads collided and left Kameda cut on the right eye. Although heads came together again there were no more deductions, and from thereon in it was Wonjongkam's better work that secured the win.

 

7 February 2010. Daiki Kameda w pts 12 Denkaosan Kaovichit.

Venue: World Memorial Hall, Kobe, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Lahcen Oumghar.

Scorecards: 116-110, 116-110, 114-112.

Fight Summary: On winning, Kameda (112) captured the WBA version of the championship, thus joining his brother Koki who was recognised by the WBC as champion. As a contest it was nothing to write home about, with Kameda slipping to the canvas five or six times and the champion being penalised two points, in the sixth and 11th, for persistent clinching. Kaovichit (110¾) made the better start, with jabs and combinations pushing the challenger back, but by the sixth he was tiring fast. Despite his attacks only consisting of single punches, for the last five rounds it was virtually all Kameda.

 

Luis Concepcion made a successful defence of his WBA ‘interim’ title when stopping Eric Ortiz inside four rounds at the Roberto Duran Arena, Panama City, Panama on 22 April. With the WBA ‘interim’ title again on the line, Concepcion followed that up with first-round stoppage win over Kaovichit at the same venue on 2 October.

 

29 November 2009. Koki Kameda w pts 12 Daisuke Naito.

Venue: Super Arena, Saitama, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Hector Afu.

Scorecards: 117-111, 116-112, 117-111.

Fight Summary: Regardless that he forced the fight throughout the 35-year-old champion was outscored by the unbeaten Kameda (112), who remained on the back foot for much of the time countering with southpaw rights and lefts. It was clear that Naito (112) threw more punches than the former undefeated WBA junior flyweight title holder, but it was also clear that he missed his target with the great majority of them, finishing the contest with a badly swollen face and a suspected broken nose. Although Naito went on the rampage in the final session he had little joy, in the main being unable to get to his man before the bell brought an end to his nightmare.

 

20 November 2009. Moruti Mthalane w pts 12 Julio Cesar Miranda.

Venue: Wembley Arena, Johannesburg, South Africa. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Robert Byrd.

Scorecards: 117-111, 117-111, 118-111.

Fight Summary: Contested for the vacant title after Nonito Donaire moved up the weight scale, it was Mthalane (112) who claimed the belt following a comprehensive points win over Miranda (111¾). Regardless of the wide decision it was a tough fight in which Miranda was always dangerous with his right hand. Boxing well behind the jab despite having to take heavy shots every now and again, Mthalane proved his class when winning four of the opening six rounds. Putting his foot on the pedal in round seven Mthalane added to his total when keeping on top of Miranda, who had a swollen right eye by the tenth, before having to survive a last-ditch effort from the latter in the 11th.

 

6 October 2009. Denkaosan Kaovichit w pts 12 Daiki Kameda.

Venue: Central Gym, Osaka, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Rafael Ramos.

Scorecards: 115-113, 115-113, 114-114.

Fight Summary: Despite the champion appearing to have retained his title by some distance, it was rather surprising to find that one of the judges had him only drawing while the other two saw him winning by seven rounds to five. The early part of the contest saw Kaovichit (111¾) making the fight, jabbing and landing hard shots to the body, and generally outworking Kameda (112). Although Kameda got himself going in the sixth, the next two sessions belonged to Kaovichit. It was in the ninth that Kameda found some joy as Kaovichit tired and clinched, his left hooks to head and body being particularly effective. The last two rounds saw both men going for the win, with the challenger edging them on the cards.

 

At the Roberto Duran Arena, Panama City, Panama on 27 November, Luis Concepcion knocked out Roberto Carlos Leyva in the fourth to retain the WBA ‘interim’ title. 

26 June 2009. Omar Narvaez w rsc 11 Omar Soto.

Venue: Luna Park Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez Jnr.

Fight Summary: Boxing with great skill the champion was happy to remain on the inside when the aggressive Soto (111) came onto him, prior to pushing his man back with precision southpaw shots to head and body. Winning every round Narvaez (112) was a class apart, the frustrated Soto having a point deducted in the eighth for head butting after being warned several times. By the tenth Narvaez was upping his offensive, and in the 11th a battery of right-lefts followed by a left cross dropped Soto. Even though Soto managed to make it to his feet the referee rescued him at 1.58 of the session, citing that he had saved him from taking further punishment.

 

When Narvaez handed in the WBO Championship Belt on 15 May 2010 on winning the organisation’s junior bantamweight title, Julio Cesar Miranda and Richie Mepranum were matched to find his successor.

26 May 2009. Denkaosan Kaovichit w pts 12 Hiroyuki Hisataka.

Venue: Central Sports Stadium, Uttaradit, Thailand. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Lahcen Oumghar.

Scorecards: 116-112, 115-112, 114-115.

Fight Summary: Almost losing his title in his first defence, Kaovichit (112) had big trouble when up against the fast-moving Hisataka (112), who made life difficult for the champion throughout with his awkwardness and movement. It was not that Hisataka threw a lot of punches, but when he did drop Kaovichit in the fifth with a right-hand counter the referee called it a slip. Docked a point for holding and hitting behind the head in the eighth, Kaovichit made his run for home in the tenth, landing a few solid shots before Hisataka grabbed him. In the final round both men were on the floor after the angry Kaovichit wrestled Hisataka down and almost out of the ring.

 

On 5 September, at the Roberto Duran Arena, Panama City, Panama, Luis Concepcion won the vacant WBA ‘interim’ title when stopping Omar Salado after 39 seconds of the 12th round.

26 May 2009. Daisuke Naito w pts 12 Xiong Zhao Zhong.

Venue: Differ-Ariake Arena, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 114-110, 114-111, 113-111.

Fight Summary: With the contest originally to be held in China, it was switched to Japan at three days’ notice after the Shanghai venue was found to be unsecured. There was never that much between the pair, but the champion was deemed by all three judges to have won a tough contest that swung back and forth, even though he had been dropped in the sixth by a long left hook when Xiong Zhao Zhong (112) found a chink in his armour. Both men were docked points for unintentional head butts, Xiong Zhao Zhong in the fourth and fifth and Naito (112) in the tenth. The Chinese fighter was proving both durable and hard hitting by the third, hurting Naito with solid blows before he too was almost down at the end of the session. Cut over the left eye in the fourth and on the right eye in the fifth, Naito was up against it. It was in the ninth that Naito finally took control, but it did not last long as the challenger, cut over the right eye in the tenth, pushed on in the 11th before being held up in the 12th as Naito got his boxing back together to make sure of the decision.

 

At the Kadcheongdoi Municipal Arena, Chiangmai, Thailand on 28 August, Pongsaklek Wonjongkam retained the WBC ‘interim’ title when stopping Takahisa Masuda inside six rounds.

19 April 2009. Nonito Donaire w rsc 4 Raul Martinez.

Venue: Araneta Coliseum, Manila, Philippines. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Pete Podgorski.

Fight Summary: Starting as he meant to carry on, the champion dropped Martinez (112) twice in the opening round with heavy left uppercuts before downing him again in the second with a left hook to the head. Moving with ease around Martinez, who came with a reputation as a power puncher, Donaire (111½) picked his man apart in the third before smashing him down again in the fourth with yet another left uppercut. At this point the referee had seen enough, rescuing the outgunned Martinez at 2.42 of the session.

 

After Donaire relinquished the IBF title on becoming the WBA ‘interim’ junior bantamweight champion on 15 August, to find a new champion, Moruti Mthalane was matched against Julio Cesar Miranda, who had beaten Eric Ortiz (w co 1 at the Cockfighting Arena, Tuxtla, Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico on 11 July) in an eliminator.

7 February 2009. Omar Narvaez w rsc 10 Rayonta Whitfield.

Venue: New Aurinegro Sports Palace, Puerto Madryn, Chabut, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Samuel Viruet.

Fight Summary: Whitfield (111¾) hardly provided the champion with a tough defence before the referee came to his aid 53 seconds into the tenth when he was under attack without being able to respond. Having won virtually every round, being supreme whether it be boxing or fighting, Narvaez (111½), carrying a cut left eye from the fifth, coolly began to take Whitfield apart. Deducted a point for his use of elbows in the seventh and another in the ninth for low blows, Whitfield was almost stopped in the ninth after a battery of southpaw rights and lefts got home. Following that, he did not last much longer.

31 December 2008. Denkaosan Kaovichit w co 2 Takefumi Sakata.

Venue: Sun Plaza Hall, Hiroshima, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Fight Summary: Making his fifth defence, and in a return battle, the slow-starting Sakata (112) was under pressure from the opening bell as Kaovichit (111¾) tore into him, landing heavy shots from both hands. It was much of the same in the second until Kaovichit sent Sakata down to be counted out at 2.55 of the session following a tremendous right to the side of the head.

23 December 2008. Daisuke Naito w rsc 11 Shingo Yamaguchi.

Venue: Kokugikan Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Yuji Fukuchi.

Fight Summary: Boxing in determined fashion the champion soon confused Yamaguchi (111¾) with his overarm punches thrown from a low, moving stance before running up a lead, even though some of the rounds were hotly contested. Although Yamaguchi had a good fourth, Naito (112) took the next few rounds as he stepped up the pace. Realising he was behind on the cards, Yamaguchi went for broke in the eighth through the tenth, putting Naito on the defensive as he poured in lefts and rights. In the 11th it was Naito who made the better start when flooring Yamaguchi with a heavy right to the head. Although Yamaguchi made it up and was punching it out with Naito, the moment he was caught by a terrific left hook, sending him to the floor, the referee called the contest off at 1.11 of the session.

 

On 24 April 2009, fighting in a makeshift outdoor arena in Chachoengsao, Thailand, Pongsaklek Wonjongkam beat Julio Cesar Miranda on points over 12 rounds to win the vacant WBC ‘interim’ title.

1 November 2008. Nonito Donaire w rsc 6 Moruti Mthalane.

Venue: Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Fight Summary: Coming back after an 11-month lay-off due to contractual problems, the ring-rusty champion was given a tough fight by Mthalane (111) regardless of the fact that he was ahead on all three cards at the time of the stoppage. Both men threw good punches, Mthalane doing well with left jabs, hooks and uppercuts while Donaire (112) favoured his speed and movement to get off sharp countering blows, one of which caused the fight to end after 1.31 of the sixth when the referee ruled that a cut on the inside of Mthalane's left eyelid was too far gone for him to continue. At that juncture Mthalane was really getting into the fight, his determined display showing that he was definitely one to watch.

20 September 2008. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Alejandro Hernandez.

Venue: New Aurinegro Sports Palace, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Luis Pabon.

Scorecards: 117-111, 116-112, 119-110.

Fight Summary: Imposing himself on Hernandez (111½), who had made a decent start, the champion once again took a contest by the scruff of the neck with countering southpaw rights and lefts finding their mark. Defending his belt for the 14th time, Narvaez (112) was never headed from the third onwards even though Hernandez was dangerous at times, especially in the seventh when landing some solid blows. Hernandez came again in the final session as he tried to turn the tide, but was unable to find a finisher.

30 July 2008. Takefumi Sakata w pts 12 Hiroyuki Hisataka.

Venue: Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Kazunobu Asao.

Scorecards: 117-111, 118-111, 116-112.

Fight Summary: Even though Hisataka (111¾) made a confident start, countering the champion smartly as he rushed in, he surprisingly faded before coming back strongly in the final session when it was all too late. Being cut over the right eye in the second hardly stopped Sakata (112) from pushing on, especially in the sixth when he landed heavily up and down as Hisataka faltered. With Sakata well in control coming into the 11th, when the damage to his eye worsened Hisataka was encouraged enough to go on the attack right through to the final bell, hurting the champion with heavy shots and making those in attendance wonder why he had not adopted those tactics earlier.

30 July 2008. Daisuke Naito w co 10 Tomonobu Shimizu.

Venue: Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Frank Garza.

Fight Summary: Down on all three cards, the champion eventually found the punches that destroyed Shimizu (112) and enabled him to retain his crown. It had been Shimizu for most of the opening nine rounds as he avoided the punches thrown by the wild-swinging Naito (112) while countering with lefts and rights. Realizing his title was slipping away from him Naito tore out for the tenth, firing in blows from both hands and keeping right on top of Shimizu until dropping him with two big rights. On his feet again, Shimizu was soon put down again by a series of heavy lefts and rights before being counted out on the 57-second mark.

9 May 2008. Omar Narvaez w rtd 7 Ivan Pozo.

Venue: Central Pavilion, Vigo, Spain. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Samuel Viruet.

Fight Summary: Dominating from the beginning, the champion was far too smart for Pozo (111½), both outboxing and outpunching him from the second onwards. Although Pozo made a reasonable start it was quickly apparent that this was going to be a hard night for him, and he was on the receiving end as Narvaez (111½) stepped it up. After being under pressure in the seventh from heavy southpaw rights and lefts, and with the referee on the verge of stopping the contest, Pozo's corner retired their man at the end of the session.

29 March 2008. Takefumi Sakata w pts 12 Shingo Yamaguchi.

Venue: Makuhari-Messe Exhibition Centre, Chiba City, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Takeshi Shimakawa.

Scorecards: 116-112, 116-112, 115-113.

Fight Summary: Winning the opening three rounds and dropping Sakata (112) in the third with a cracking right cross, it was the challenger who made the better start. However, from the fourth Sakata got right back into the fight when going on the front foot, and even though he was cut over the right eye in the fifth from a Yamaguchi (111¾) attack it made no difference. In the sixth Sakata found the way home, attacking the body and keeping on top of Yamaguchi from thereon in despite the latter fighting back hard on occasion.

8 March 2008. Daisuke Naito drew 12 Pongsaklek Wonjongkam.

Venue: Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Hector Afu.

Scorecards: 115-113, 114-115, 114-114.

Fight Summary: In a return match, Naito (112) just about held on to his title by a split draw. Wonjongkam (112) made the better start when taking the opening four rounds, Naito being wild in his attacks and lacking in accuracy, but from the fifth through to the eighth it was the latter who picked it up as the challenger tired. Following that, Wonjongkam got himself going again, his southpaw combinations making their mark before Naito came on strongly in the final session to continue his hold on the belt.

25 January 2008. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Carlos Tamara.

Venue: Aurinegro New Palace Arena, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Scorecards: 119-109, 119-109, 120-108.

Fight Summary: Although Tamara (112) started quickly when trying to impose himself on the champion he soon found that he was up against a superior boxer and a southpaw to boot. Moving in and out of Tamara's blows, Narvaez (111½) was soon in control with fast, accurate punches to the head. Despite it being competitive Tamara was not winning the rounds, and in the sixth Narvaez proved what a difficult man he was to pin down as he boxed on the back foot, sending in excellent counters. In the 11th a head butt left Narvaez cut over the left eye, but it made no difference as he cantered to victory.

1 December 2007. Nonito Donaire w rsc 8 Luis Maldonado.

Venue: Foxwoods Casino, Mashantucket, Connecticut, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Charles Dwyer.

Fight Summary: Proving to be a very good fighter, the champion picked his punches with precision throughout, barely wasting any effort as he cut Maldonado (111) over both eyes in the second before forcing a stoppage. Having taken time out, Donaire (111) roared back into circulation when a terrific right uppercut-left hook smashed Maldonado down at the end of the seventh. Allowed out for the eighth after an inspection by the ringside doctor, Maldonado was quickly under the cosh, being pinned on the ropes, taking punch after punch, before the referee stepped in at 1.16 of the session following a hurtful left hook to the body that sent him staggering.

4 November 2007. Takefumi Sakata drew 12 Denkaosan Kaovichit.

Venue: Super Arena, Saitama, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Mark Nelson.

Scorecards: 113-113, 114-112, 112-115.

Fight Summary: Starting strongly, throwing heavy punches from the opening bell, the challenger struck first when he had Sakata (112) over from a solid right to the head. Kaovichit (111½) continued to land with good hooks and uppercuts, even cutting Sakata over the right eye in the seventh before tiring. At the start of the eighth Sakata was trailing with plenty to do. However, working the body well and keeping on top of Kaovichit for the remainder of the contest, Sakata just about secured a split draw. Had Kaovichit, who hurt his right thumb in the fourth, not been deducted a point for holding in the 12th he would have been the new champion.

11 October 2007. Daisuke Naito w pts 12 Daiki Kameda.

Venue: Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Vic Drakulich.

Scorecards: 117-107, 117-107, 116-108.

Fight Summary: Making his first defence in what turned out to be a fight filled with animosity, Naito (112), cut over the right eye in the third, retained his title due to the fact that his punches had the better quality and there were more of them. The main difference between the two boxers being that Naito built on combinations while Kameda (112) threw one punch at a time. Both fighters committed a series of fouls, Naito being deducted a point in the ninth for hitting Kameda on the back of the head when they were both down, while Kameda lost three points in the 12th for twice throwing his man and also lifting him. Although there were no official knockdowns, the men were on the floor on several occasions from slips and wrestling.

14 September 2007. Omar Narvaez w rsc 4 Marlon Marquez.

Venue: Number 1 Municipal Gym, Trelew, Chubut, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Fight Summary: Despite the challenger making a decent start, once Narvaez (112) got his southpaw right-lefts going in the third it was going to take a lot to derail him. Showing that he had got over an injured left hand suffered in an accident, Narvaez overwhelmed Marquez (112) from the third onwards with combinations to head and body doing the damage, and in the fourth following two knockdowns the referee rescued the outclassed Nicaraguan at 2.47 of the session to save him from taking further punishment.

18 July 2007. Daisuke Naito w pts 12 Pongsaklek Wonjongkam.

Venue: Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Toby Gibson.

Scorecards: 115-113, 116-113, 116-113.

Fight Summary: Looking to put two previous defeats at the hands of the champion behind him, Naito (112) sensationally captured the title when winning the unanimous decision. Wonjongkam (112) had failed to make the weight at the first time of asking, and although he managed to take off 1.25lbs in just under an hour he looked drained, lacking his normal speed. Beginning quickly, throwing big overarm rights, Naito surprised Wonjongkam as he moved in and out with heavy shots, some finding the target and some not, whilst the latter had difficulty getting into range with his powerful southpaw blows. After Wonjongkam was cut over the right eye in the fourth, Naito pushed ahead in the fifth and sixth before the champion came on strongly in the seventh through to the ninth when cutting back the deficit and opening up a cut over the latter's right eye. The last three sessions saw both men tiring, but a big right in the 11th that dazed Wonjongkam virtually sealed the win for Naito despite the Thai fighting furiously in the 12th. Prior to this contest, Wonjongkam had successfully defended the WBC title on 17 occasions.

7 July 2007. Nonito Donaire w rsc 5 Vic Darchinyan.

Venue: Harbor Yard Arena, Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Eddie Claudio.

Fight Summary: Not expected to worry the champion too much, Donaire (112) gave him all the trouble he could muster before forcing a stoppage at 1.38 of the fifth. Although Darchinyan (112) was throwing solid southpaw shots by the second it was Donaire who seemed to be the most effective, and in the third the Filipino landed several cracking left hooks which shook his rival up. Coming back strongly in the fourth Darchinyan shaded the round before disaster struck in the fifth when he was caught flush by a left hook that sent him to the floor. Staggering up at 'seven', after Darchinyan crashed into the ropes the referee called it off at 1.38 of the session when the latter's corner were already calling for it to be stopped.

1 July 2007. Takefumi Sakata w pts 12 Roberto Vasquez.

Venue: Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Stan Christodoulou.

Scorecards: 116-113, 116-112, 115-113.

Fight Summary: Sakata (111¾), making the first defence of the title he had won from Lorenzo Parra after the latter had failed to make the championship weight, safely held on to his belt at the first time of asking when outscoring Vasquez (112). In doing so, Sakata had to survive some heavy southpaw shots in the opening three rounds before Vasquez went off the boil and allowed the champion back into it. Vasquez came back strongly in the eighth and ninth, opening a cut over Sakata's right eye, but failed to force the issue. Although the last three sessions saw the judges having difficulty in splitting them, Sakata had done enough by then.

6 April 2007. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rtd 7 Tomonobu Shimizu.

Venue: Tabkwang District Main Stadium, Saraburi, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Brad Vocale.

Fight Summary: Having it easy for the opening three or four rounds, the champion quickly realised that he had little to worry about before stepping it up in the fifth. After taking a battering from Wonjongkam (112) in the seventh, being floored by a southpaw straight right and right up against it, Shimizu (111¾) was retired at the end of the session by his corner.

10 March 2007. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Brahim Asloum.

Venue: Sports Palace, Le Cannet, France. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Scorecards: 118-109, 117-110, 116-111.

Fight Summary: Off to a quick start the southpaw champion sent Asloum (111¼) to the boards in the opening session from a blow to the back of the head that should not have counted as a knockdown. The former champion then picked it up to have a good third and fourth when sending in some cracking blows, only to find Narvaez (112) shrugging them off. From the sixth through to the ninth it was all Narvaez, who punished Asloum with combinations a plenty before the latter came back with some good shots of his own to win the tenth and 12th rounds. As well as he boxed, Asloum could not keep up with Narvaez, winning three rounds at most.

3 March 2007. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 12 Jose Victor Burgos.

Venue: Home Depot Centre, Carson, California, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Jon Schorle.

Fight Summary: In what was virtually a one-way win, the tough southpaw champion went on to the front foot from the opening bell with Burgos (111¼) moving away as soon as he felt the power. Dropped in the second by a heavy right and slipping down several times, Burgos bravely tried to stay with Darchinyan (111½) but ultimately found it an impossible task. Burgos was still there at the start of the final session but, after being rescued on the 1.27 mark while still upright, he collapsed before being rushed to hospital. Operated on to remove a blood clot from the brain the procedure appeared to be successful, and although he would never box again he associated himself with the sport as soon as he was able.

17 November 2006. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Monelisi Myekeni.

Venue: Suranaree Stadium, Korat, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 119-108, 117-111, 118-110.

Fight Summary: A difficult fight for the southpaw champion saw Myekeni (111¾) spending virtually all of his time on the back foot after he had been dropped in the opening session by a solid right hook. Chasing his man for round after round, Wonjongkam (112) occasionally caught up with Myekeni, hurting him with every punch that connected. When he did have his man going in the fifth, Wonjongkam was denied a quick win when the referee mistook the ten-second clanger for the bell to end the round. After Wonjongkam relaxed towards the end, knowing he had the fight in the bag, Myekeni at last came forward to the cheers of the crowd despite it being of no value at that stage of the contest.

14 October 2006. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Walberto Ramos.

Venue: Luna Park Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Scorecards: 115-111, 117-109, 115-112.

Fight Summary: Regardless that the challenger gave him a tough fight, Narvaez (112) was nearly always one step ahead with the southpaw jab and cross leading the way. Although Ramos (111¾), swinging wildly at times, was never at risk from being stopped had he been more accurate he might have caused Narvaez real problems. In the eighth Ramos was docked a point for low blows, something he had been guilty of previously, and in the ninth two of the judges marked it a 10-8 round such was Narvaez's dominance. Despite being cut on the left eye in the sixth from a head butt Narvaez did enough even though he finished exhausted.

7 October 2006. Vic Darchinyan w tdec 6 Glenn Donaire.

Venue: Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Tony Weeks.

Scorecards: 60-53, 60-53, 60-53.

Fight Summary: On top from the first bell, the southpaw champion, throwing heavy rights and lefts, quickly put Donaire (111) on the back foot. Despite this it was still competitive, Donaire landing shots of his own only for Darchinyan (112) to hit him harder and more often. Dropped in the fourth by a solid right to the chin, Donaire was soon on his feet before being put under the cosh again from thereon in. The fight came to an end at 1.27 of the sixth when Donaire stopped fighting and told the referee that he suspected his jaw had been broken. Further to an inspection by the ringside doctor the referee went to the cards.

5 August 2006. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Rexon Flores.

Venue: The Orfeo Superdome, Cordoba, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Samuel Viruet.

Scorecards: 119-107, 119-107, 120-106.

Fight Summary: Although Narvaez (111½) began in cautious mode, once he had seen what he was up against he soon picked up the pace with southpaw rights and lefts, while the aggressive challenger also got himself into the contest when landing some heavy shots, especially in the sixth. Having been penalised in the fourth for low blows, Flores (110) was deducted another point in the seventh for a head butt. Faster and more accurate than his foe, Narvaez was in firm control from the ninth, banging in rights and lefts, but Flores was always in front of him right to the end, never taking a backward step.

30 June 2006. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 4 Everardo Morales.

Venue: Siam Paragon Hall, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bill Clancy.

Fight Summary: In breaking Miguel Canto's record for WBC defences, the hard-hitting southpaw champion proved his credentials. Certainly, he was far too good for the limited Morales (111¾), who despite fighting bravely was no match for Wonjongkam (112). Pressurised from the opening bell when being caught by heavy left hands, Morales was dropped in the second and again in the third when he just about survived the round. The fight was eventually stopped 55 seconds into the fourth when Morales was pouring blood from cuts over both eyes and taking a hammering.

3 June 2006. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 8 Luis Maldonado.

Venue: Thomas & Mack Centre, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Fight Summary: Going well for several rounds, the clever challenger made Darchinyan (112) work hard to secure the win as he cleverly used the jab-and-move routine to keep out of trouble. Having been outboxed in the third Darchinyan picked it up in the fourth, cutting Maldonado (112) on the right eye and almost putting the latter down in the fifth, before dropping him with a southpaw left in the sixth. With Darchinyan landing big lefts to the head from thereon in it was just a matter of time, and after Maldonado had been hammered continuously in the seventh when a cracking left hander to the head sent him into the ropes in the eighth the referee called it off at 1.38 of the session.

1 May 2006. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Daigo Nakahiro.

Venue: 11th Infantry Regiment Barracks, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Michael Griffin.

Scorecards: 120-107, 119-110, 120-107.

Fight Summary: Making it 14 successful defences following his unanimous points win, Wonjongkam (112) matched Miguel Canto's WBC record. Being beaten in his previous fight by Daisuke Naito was not the best way for Nakahiro (112) to come into this one, and when he was subjected to a storming body attack from the opening bell and was dropped in the second for a count of 'nine' it looked like it was going to be an early night for him. Although the hard-hitting Wonjongkam was always in control he never pressed hard for a stoppage, apart from in the ninth and tenth, being happy to cruise home.

3 March 2006. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 8 Diosdado Gabi.

Venue: Chumash Casino Resort, Santa Ynez, California, USA.  Recognition: IBF. Referee: David Mendoza.

Fight Summary: Darchinyan (112) retained his title when stopping Gabi (111) inside eight rounds in a battle of southpaws. Even though Gabi started reasonably well the awkward looking Darchinyan began to find his feet from the third onwards, slamming in blows from both hands from thereon in. Gabi never wavered from his task, but while game and doughty, especially in the fifth, he was gradually being ground down. When a heavy left to the head dropped Gabi in the eighth, although he beat the count, the referee wisely called it off at 2.42 of the session.

16 February 2006. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Gilberto Keb Baas.

Venue: The Open Air Arena, Chainart, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 119-110, 120-109, 120-109.

Fight Summary: Getting into the driving seat from the opening bell, the southpaw champion breezed to a clear points win over Keb Baas (112), a man who seemed only interested in staying the course. Despite having speed, reach and all-round ability in his favour the hard-punching Wonjongkam (112) was happy to take no risks when sending in right jabs from distance, rarely following his work up. Stepping on the gas only occasionally, the Thai disappointed his fans who expected a shoot-out.

 

On 8 April, at the Thomas & Mack Centre, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, Jorge Arce (111) knocked out Rosendo Alvarez (115) inside six rounds. Supposed to be a defence of Arce’s WBC ‘interim’ honours, the title was not at stake after Alvarez failed to make the required weight. Following that, Arce was quick to move up a weight division.

5 December 2005. Omar Narvaez w rsc 11 Bernard Inom.

Venue: Bercy Sports Palace, Paris, France. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Lou Moret.

Fight Summary: Having fought from the third round with a badly swollen left eye, the challenger showed tremendous character in the fifth when he somehow kept going for at least two minutes after a southpaw right hook had him on ‘Queer Street’. How Inom (110¾) got through that was amazing, and he even won the sixth as Narvaez (111½) tried to get his wind back. Although some of the rounds were close, it was Narvaez who caught the eye with the more telling punches, and he turned up the heat in the tenth to put Inom down with a right hook. Having made it to the bell, Inom was rescued by the referee at 1.43 of the 11th when he was under attack and unable to fight back.

5 December 2005. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Brahim Asloum.

Venue: Bercy Sports Palace, Paris, France. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Mark Nelson.

Scorecards: 118-109, 120-107, 119-108.

Fight Summary: Taken out of his stride in the opening round after a clash of heads opened a cut over his right eye, the unbeaten challenger was then put down from a series of combination punches thrown by Parra (111½). Although up fairly quickly it was noticeable that Asloum (112) was suffering a loss of confidence. It took several rounds before Asloum could mount a challenge, but Parra was always his master. Hurt in the eighth by a burst of left hooks, Asloum kept going and even tried looking for the big punch that could turn things his way. However, at the final bell he was a wide loser on the cards.

 

Due to defend against Roberto Vasquez on 21 October 2006, when Parra was forced to pull out after suffering injured knee ligaments the former met Takefumi Sakata to contest the vacant ‘interim’ title at the Bercy Sports Palace on 2 December 2006, winning a split points decision after 12 rounds. With Parra still not recovered the WBA tried to bring Vasquez and Sakata together in a return, but negotiations were tenuous and the fight failed to take place. It was then announced that Parra was going to defend his title against Sakata at the Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan on 19 March 2007, with the winner giving Vasquez first crack at the title. After all of the waiting it was ridiculous for Parra (116¾) to then lose his title on the scales. Although the fight went ahead only Sakata could win the title, and following a three-round stoppage victory over Parra the WBA declared him champion.

10 October 2005. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w tdec 7 Daisuke Naito.

Venue: Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Lupe Garcia.

Scorecards: 68-64, 68-64, 68-64.

Fight Summary: Despite having a quick win over Naito (112) on his record, Wonjongkam (112) started slowly against the aggressive challenger, being content to counter before having a point deducted in the second for a head butt. With Naito now cut over the right eye, the southpaw Wonjongkam began to get home with left-right combinations to the head as he attempted to worsen the damage, but Naito continued to fight back strongly. Unfortunately it was a lost cause and, at 2.38 of the seventh the referee called for the cards to be totted up following the doctor’s advice that Naito’s cut was now too bad for him to continue.

 

At The Arena, Monterrey, Mexico on 16 December, Jorge Arce stopped Adonis Rivas in the tenth round, and then defeated the same opponent by way of a sixth-round retirement at the Bullring, Cancun, Mexico on 28 January 2006 to retain his WBC ‘interim’ title.

19 September 2005. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Takefumi Sakata.

Venue: Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Scorecards: 115-113, 114-113, 114-114.

Fight Summary: Following on from their first encounter, it was another tough fight for the defending champion despite him starting well with the jab as Sakata (112) looked to find his way in. From the third round onwards Sakata began to unload, and Parra (112) had several uncomfortable moments as he tried to box his rival off before becoming more successful with accurate combinations as the fight wore on. With the busy Sakata still desperately trying to find a finisher, a tiring Parra was deducted a point in the 11th session for straying low before holding on for the split decision in his favour.

24 August 2005. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 5 Jair Jimenez.

Venue: Entertainment Centre, Sydney, Australia. Recognition: IBF. Referee: John Wright.

Fight Summary: Darchinyan (112) was in complete control right from the opening bell against Jimenez (111½), sending in hurtful punches to head and body before dropping the challenger in the fourth round with a heavy left cross. Although Jimenez got to his feet he barely made it to the bell, and after being badly staggered again by Darchinyan (112) in the fifth the referee had seen enough, rescuing him at 2.23 of the session. Jimenez had lost his previous two contests.

27 March 2005. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 8 Mzukisi Sikali.

Venue: State Sports Centre, Homebush Bay, Australia. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Pete Podgorski.

Fight Summary: Starting well, the aggressive champion was soon on the attack with powerful punches to head and body before Sikali (111¾) battled back in rounds three and four with sharp combinations. Both men worked well during the fifth, and although Sikali outboxed Darchinyan (112) in the sixth he was wobbled badly from a volley of blows prior to the end of the seventh. Thereafter it was all one-way traffic, and at 2.28 of the eighth Sikali was pulled out of the contest by the referee after he had shown signs of not wishing to continue.

29 January 2005. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 5 Noriyuki Komatsu.

Venue: Prefectural Gym, Osaka, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Malcolm Bulner.

Fight Summary: The champion was far too good for Komatsu (112), who was cut over the left eye in the second and floored by a cracking southpaw left in the same session prior to receiving a thorough going over. Although Komatsu tried to fight back, Wonjongkam (112) continued to land solid combinations throughout the third and fourth rounds before dropping his rival again, this time with a right hook. Despite Komatsu getting up he suffered another knockdown following a barrage of combination punches, and on finding his feet again the referee called the fight off at 1.42 of the fifth when the doctor decided that the latter’s cut was too bad for him to continue.

 

On 30 July, Jorge Arce stopped Angel Antonio Priolo in the third round at the Arturo Nahl Stadium, La Paz, Baja California, Mexico to win the vacant WBC ‘interim’ title. He then defended it by a second-round stoppage win over Hussein Hussein at the Thomas & Mack Centre, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA on 8 October.

3 January 2005. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Trash Nakanuma.

Venue: Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Armando Garcia.

Scorecards: 116-112, 116-112, 115-113.

Fight Summary: Controlling the fight with ease for the opening five rounds, the champion proved to be a cut above Nakanuma (111½), who was one-paced and threw one punch at a time. However, in the sixth Nakanuma came to life, sending in shots to head and body before Parra (111¼) took back the initiative, mixing up his boxing with good movement and speed. With time running out, the 11th and 12th rounds saw Nakanuma throw everything to the wind as he tore into Parra with heavy combination shots, but he had left it too late. Somehow, Parra was able to hold on even though a cracker of a right to the head saw him eventually collapse to the floor after the bell had rung to end the contest.

16 December 2004. Vic Darchinyan w rsc 11 Irene Pacheco.

Venue: Hard Rock Hotel, Hollywood, Florida, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Jorge Alonso.

Fight Summary: Having fought only six times in five years, the champion had great difficulty in holding off the ferocious Darchinyan (111½), who gave his rival no time to think as he bludgeoned his way forward. Although Pacheco (112) came back with some furious rallies in rounds five and six, Darchinyan was able to take what was on offer before coming back with shots of his own. Following an interruption between rounds eight and nine, due to fireworks going off in the outdoor arena, Pacheco started to drop his punches low, which saw him deducted three points in the ninth and tenth. Time was now running out for the champion, and after being dropped at the end of the tenth by a left hook Pacheco was taken out of the contest by the referee at 0.44 of the 11th when floored heavily by a similar punch.

9 September 2004. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Yo-Sam Choi.

Venue: Changchung Gym, Seoul, South Korea. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Scorecards: 116-113, 117-111, 116-112.

Fight Summary: Once again Parra (112) showed off his speed and skill to outscore a challenger, but lacked the power to take his rival out before having to settle for a points victory. Choi (112), a former junior flyweight champion, came back in the middle rounds to unsettle Parra at times, but the latter got himself going in the last three sessions to emphasise his superiority.

15 July 2004. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 5 Luis Angel Martinez.

Venue: Central Sports Centre, Khonkaen, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: David Chung.

Fight Summary: Yet again showing his southpaw skills and controlled aggression to the full, the champion dominated from the opening bell before suffering a bad cut over his left eye in the fourth, for which Martinez (112) was deducted a point for an accidental butt. From there onwards, Wonjongkam (112), leaving nothing to chance, picked up the pace to work Martinez over and drop him heavily with a right hook in the fifth. Back in the fray, but under severe pressure from Wonjongkam’s follow-up attack, Martinez was rescued by the referee at 1.49 of the session.

4 June 2004. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Takefumi Sakata.

Venue: Ariake Coliseum, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBA. Referee: John Coyle.

Scorecards: 115-113, 117-111, 114-114.

Fight Summary: This was a tough defence for Parra (112) who, despite making a good start to win the opening three rounds going away, was subjected to persistent body attacks in the middle rounds as Sakata (112) came on strongly. Although he was under severe pressure in the tenth, Parra came back powerfully to take the final two sessions, outpunching and outboxing Sakata to make sure of the decision.

6 March 2004. Omar Narvaez w rsc 3 Reginaldo Martins Carvalho.

Venue: Luna Park Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Fight Summary: With his title on the line for the sixth time, Narvaez (111½) showed his class from the opening bell to overwhelm Martins Carvalho (109) with excellent combinations before rocking him with a southpaw left uppercut in the second. The writing was clearly on the wall, and when Narvaez tossed in a series of unanswered combinations in the third the referee had seen enough, bringing the contest to a halt at 1.28 of the round.

3 January 2004. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Trash Nakanuma.

Venue: The Pacifico, Yokohama, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 116-112, 116-113, 115-113.

Fight Summary: The southpaw champion, defending his title for the ninth time, skilfully outpointed the hard-punching Nakanuma (112), being quite happy at times to swap blows with his rival as he confirmed his superiority. Picking his punches well, Wonjongkam (112) came under pressure several times, notably in the fourth, fifth and eighth rounds, but remained unruffled even in the 12th session as Nakanuma went all out for victory.

6 December 2003. Lorenzo Parra w pts 12 Eric Morel.

Venue: Ruben Rodriguez Coliseum, Bayamon, Puerto Rico. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Luis Pabon.

Scorecards: 116-111, 116-111, 115-112.

Fight Summary: Although the champion started with speed and style, Parra (111¾) surprised him with his cleverness and adroitness, and surprised him even more when knocking him down with a hard right to the head in the third round. During the next few sessions Parra danced ahead, scoring with light but effective left jabs, before Morel (112) came back to nail and pressure him in the middle rounds as he looked to make up the leeway. However, in the tenth, Parra got back into his stride, jumping in and out with fast flurries that took him through to final bell and victory as Morel tired.

14 November 2003. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Hussein Hussein.

Venue: Lumpini Stadium, Bangkok, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: David Chung.

Scorecards: 117-111, 117-113, 116-111.

Fight Summary: Despite having to take off excess weight at the weigh-in, the southpaw champion boxed close to his best to defeat the previously unbeaten Hussein (111½), who had a distinct reach advantage and plenty of power to go with it. Although a close fight between two well-matched opponents, Wonjongkam (112) generally dictated the way it went, his right hook and jab paving the way, and he put the seal on his victory when dropping Hussein in the 11th round.

14 November 2003. Omar Narvaez w rtd 10 Alexander Makhmutov.

Venue: Marcel Cerdan Sports Palace, Levallois-Perret, France. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Samuel Viruet.

Fight Summary: Making an aggressive start when taking the fight to the southpaw champion, Makhmutov (111½) was countered for his pains as Narvaez (112) stayed close and landed telling punches. Having taken a clear lead by the middle rounds, Narvaez opened up with right hooks to head and body to floor Makhmutov in the ninth, and following the tenth, a round in which Makhmutov took heavy punishment, the latter was retired by his corner.

27 September 2003. Irene Pacheco w rtd 6 Damaen Kelly.

Venue: Berran Country Club Auditorium, Barranquilla, Colombia. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Manuel Rodriguez.

Fight Summary: Following a feeling-out period, by the third round Pacheco (111¾) was beginning to get through Kelly’s defences. In the next session, the champion again upped the tempo, totally dominating proceedings right through to the end of the fifth session, winging in punches to head and body. Dropped at the start of the sixth from a body punch, and down twice more in the same round also from body punches, Kelly (111¾) retired on his stool prior to the seventh getting underway.

9 August 2003. Omar Narvaez drew 12 Andrea Sarritzu.

Venue: Municipal Amphitheatre, Villasimius, Sardinia, Italy. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Luis Pabon.

Scorecards: 116-112, 113-115, 114-114.

Fight Summary: Confident enough to defend his title in Italy against an opponent who had taken him close the previous year, Narvaez (110¼) again held on to his title, the draw appearing to favour Sarritzu (109¼) this time around. Although Sarritzu again proved a tough nut to crack, getting home with occasional heavy shots against his southpaw opponent and staging a grandstand finish, the slick-boxing Narvaez looked to have had the better of it generally.

28 June 2003. Eric Morel w pts 12 Isidro Garcia.

Venue: Hiram Bithorn Stadium, Bayamon, Puerto Rico. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.

Scorecards: 116-110, 115-111, 115-111.

Fight Summary: In what was a much tougher fight than was expected for the champion, Garcia (111), always trying to work the body, may have lacked the power but he certainly did not lack heart, proving it when walking through the punches on occasion. Carrying a fast and heavy jab, Morel (112) disappointed in not using it constantly and then moving as the fighter of old, often being content to match blows when he did not have to. Despite being docked points in the fifth and eighth rounds for low blows, the stumpy Garcia kept chugging away, forcing Morel to fight his fight, and received appreciative applause at the final bell.

7 June 2003. Omar Narvaez w rsc 5 Everardo Morales.

Venue: Luna Park Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Bill Connors.

Fight Summary: A stocky and aggressive southpaw with fast hands, Narvaez (112) was on top of his challenger from the beginning, and in the fifth he floored Morales (111½) with a heavy left cross. Although Morales made it to his feet and went back into the fray, Narvaez was hammering away at him furiously when the referee stepped in with 25 seconds of the round left.

6 June 2003. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Randy Mangubat.

Venue: The Stadium, Songkla, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Brian McMahon.

Scorecards: 118-109, 118-109, 119-110.

Fight Summary: Defending for the seventh time, Wonjongkam (112) once again impressed with good scoring shots to the head while the durable Mangubat (112) worked well to the body, something the champion was never really comfortable with. Although Mangubat was docked a point in the tenth when going low, the wide margins on all three scorecards proved that many of his body shots were not considered to be scoring punches.

14 December 2002. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Andrea Sarritzu.

Venue: Quartu Saint Elena Sports Palace, Cagliari, Italy. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Scorecards: 112-116, 116-113, 116-112.

Fight Summary: Boxing on foreign soil for the first time, Narvaez (111¼) held on to his title by a split decision after being pushed all the way by Sarritzu (111¾), who proved an extremely tough test. The southpaw champion had set a fast pace from the start, but the hard-punching Sarritzu stayed with him and finished the stronger of the two.

29 November 2002. Irene Pacheco w pts 12 Alejandro Montiel.

Venue: Convention Centre, El Paso, Texas, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Robert Gonzalez.

Scorecards: 115-112, 118-109, 117-110.

Fight Summary: Pacheco (111) never looked likely to win inside the distance even though Montiel (112) was badly cut under the left eye, something which only seemed to spur him on. Despite more cuts appearing the Mexican was inspired to attack the body, having fair success, but the champion finished the stronger to take the decision.

26 November 2002. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Hidenobu Honda.

Venue: The Dome, Osaka, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.

Scorecards: 119-109, 115-113, 116-112.

Fight Summary: Setting a fast pace, Wonjongkam (111½) kept on the attack against a slippery challenger whose main aim was to avoid taking punishment. However, into the final third, although Honda (111¾) hit back to dominate the last four rounds it was not enough by a long chalk.

12 October 2002. Eric Morel w rsc 11 Denkaosan Kaovichit.

Venue: Arrowhead Pond Arena, Anaheim, California, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Raul Caiz.

Fight Summary: Initially, the tough Kaovichit (111½) stood his ground before being eventually worn down with body punches and dropped in the 11th round following a sustained attack. Although Kaovichit managed to get up, Morel (112) was now firing off straight punches, and after the challenger sunk to his knees the fight was called off on the 1.40 mark.

13 September 2002. Omar Narvaez w disq 10 Luis Alberto Lazarte.

Venue: Municipal Gym, Trelew, Santa Cruz, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Carlos Roldan.

Fight Summary: Well ahead after a boring affair, it appeared to be only a matter of time before the southpaw Narvaez (112) stepped on the gas. Unfortunately for the fans it never happened, and the outgunned Lazarte (109½) was eventually thrown out at 2.23 of the tenth after a head butt cut the champion over the left eye.

6 September 2002. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w pts 12 Jesus Martinez.

Venue: Future Park Plaza, Rangsit, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Tony Perez.

Scorecards: 120-107, 119-109, 120-106.

Fight Summary: Put down twice, in the third and 11th rounds, Martinez (112) was no match for the hard-hitting southpaw champion, Wonjongkam (112), who got stronger as the fight progressed to run out a clear winner.

13 July 2002. Omar Narvaez w pts 12 Adonis Rivas.

Venue: Luna Park Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Joe Cortez.

Scorecards: 117-109, 117-109, 119-107. 

Fight Summary: In only his 12th bout, the southpaw Narvaez (111¾) became the first of the 2000 Olympians to win a world title when he waltzed to a lopsided points win over Rivas (111½), who was making his first defence. The Nicaraguan was outboxed from start to finish as the scores suggested.

19 April 2002. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w co 1 Daisuke Naito.

Venue: Provincial Stadium, Khonkaen, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Guillermo Ayon.

Fight Summary: Registering the quickest kayo in the division thus far, Wonjongkam (112), covering up against a furious attack, suddenly unleashed a cracking southpaw left to the jaw of the challenging Naito (112), who was duly counted out after just 34 seconds.

6 December 2001. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 2 Luis Alberto Lazarte.
Venue: Ambassador City Jomtien Hotel, Pattaya, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: David Chung.
Fight Summary: Wonjongkam (112) soon got going, stiff, hurtful punches getting to Lazarte (110½) early on, and a cracking left put the Argentine down in the second round. Although the challenger did not look up to the job in hand, it was a surprise when the towel was thrown. Following that, the fight was halted by the referee on the 2.43 mark.

9 November 2001. Irene Pacheco w rsc 4 Mike Trejo.
Venue: Sunset Station, San Antonio, Texas, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Robert Gonzalez.
Fight Summary: Having come back from a broken hand Pacheco (111½) soon moved ahead of Trejo (111½), who appeared slow by comparison and was too wild to inflict much damage. It had turned into a crude affair, but the challenger was being jarred up, and upon rising from a knockdown in the fourth the referee closed matters at 1.45 of the round.

26 October 2001. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w tdec 8 Alex Baba.
Venue: Indoor Basketball Gym, Hat Yai, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Richie Davies.
Scorecards: 79-73, 79-73, 79-71.
Fight Summary: Taking the initiative from the start, Wonjongkam (112), an excellent southpaw puncher with a good defence, landed accurate combinations to go into the lead before sustaining a bad cut on the left eyebrow in the fourth following an accidental collision. From there on, Baba (112) gamely got back into the fight until the champion cut loose again in the eighth, only for his eye damage to worsen and leave the referee no alternative but to pull him out on the 2.35 mark to go to the scorecards.

8 September 2001. Fernando Montiel w pts 12 Jose Angel Lopez.
Venue: Lawlor Events Centre, Reno, Nevada, USA. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Norm Budden.
Scorecards: 116-110, 116-111, 118-110. 
Fight Summary: Despite boxing his way into a clear lead and cutting his challenger over both eyes, Montiel (112) was himself dropped in the ninth by Lopez (111½), who then staged a late-round rally to no avail.
 
On 4 May 2002, Adonis Rivas, a former WBO junior bantamweight champion, outpointed Jair Jimenez over 12 rounds at the National Stadium, Managua, Nicaragua to win the vacant WBO ‘interim’ title before being named as champion after Montiel moved up a division to win the WBO junior bantamweight crown on 22 June 2002.

15 July 2001. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 5 Hayato Asai.
Venue: Aichi Martial Arts Hall, Nagoya, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Bruce McTavish.
Fight Summary: Aggressive from the start, Wonjongkam (112) dropped Asai (112), who had started well enough, twice in the fourth and once in the fifth from southpaw right hooks and combinations. Having got up from the third knockdown, but being battered from all angles, the challenger was taken out of the contest by the referee in the fifth with 47 seconds on the clock.

8 June 2001. Eric Morel w rtd 8 Jose De Jesus Lopez.
Venue: Ho-Chunk Casino, Baraboo, Wisconsin, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Dick Bartman.
Fight Summary: With his injured hands fully repaired, Morel (112) outclassed De Jesus Lopez (111), who despite having fast hands stayed within range for too long and made himself an easy target. The challenger had a terrible third round, being knocked down twice, and by the sixth was little more than a punch bag. Hit with non-stop punches in the seventh, De Jesus Lopez went down again, this time taking Morel with him. Although rising to bravely fight on, he was retired on his stool at the end of the eighth.

25 May 2001. Fernando Montiel w co 1 Juan Domingo Cordoba.
Venue: Alebrije Discotheque, Acapulco, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Roberto Ramirez.
Fight Summary: Montiel (112) did not hang around in this one, putting Cordoba (112) down twice with left hooks to the body before battering the challenger to the canvas for the third time where he remained to be counted out after just 135 seconds of the first round.

24 March 2001. Fernando Montiel w rsc 7 Zoltan Lunka.
Venue: Rudi-Sedlmayer Hall, Munich, Germany. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Ismael Quinones-Falu.
Fight Summary: Dominating from the start, Montiel (111½) landed some great right uppercuts to demolish the challenging Lunka (111½), who showed a lot of courage before being rescued by the referee at 2.03 of the seventh round when unable to fight back.

2 March 2001. Pongsaklek Wonjongkam w rsc 1 Malcolm Tunacao.

Venue: Open Air Arena, Pichit, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Kim-Jae Bong.
Fight Summary: Although the bigger man, Tunacao (112) was backed to the ropes and dropped by a heavy right almost immediately the fight had got underway. Put down again by a left-right, following the mandatory ‘eight’ count the southpaw champion bravely tried to fight back, but Wonjongkam (112), also a portsider, was having none of it. Keeping up the pressure, Wonjongkam found another big right to bring matters to a halt on the 2.42 mark after the referee had seen enough.

 

15 December 2000. Eric Morel w pts 12 Gilberto Keb Baas.

Venue: Alliant Energy Centre, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Dick Bartman.

Scorecards: 116-111, 117-109, 117-109.

Fight Summary: After knocking Keb Baas (112) down in the second following a sharp burst of punches, it was felt that Morel (112) would use his wonderful left jab to further unlock the challenger’s defences. He did not, the only explanation being that he had an injury. Unable to force the fight, the diminutive Mexican boxed well on the retreat and posed problems, especially when Morel went to sleep, but he was always trailing.

 

15 December 2000. Fernando Montiel w rsc 7 Isidro Garcia.

Venue: Spectacle Centre, Obregon City, Mexico. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Bill Connors.

Fight Summary: The title changed hands when Montiel (112) knocked Garcia (111¾) down five times on his way to a spectacular seventh-round stoppage at 2.15, in what was the champion’s first defence.

 

10 November 2000. Irene Pacheco w pts 12 Masibulele Makepula.

Venue: Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Richard Steele.

Scorecards: 118-110, 117-111, 114-114.

Fight Summary: In a fight that had appeared to be much closer and favouring the challenger, who worked the body well, Pacheco (111) somehow or other was given the verdict. The fact that Makepula (111) faded badly over the final three rounds made it much closer, but a draw would have been fairer.

 

7 October 2000. Eric Morel w pts 12 Alberto Ontiveros.

Venue: MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Kenny Bayless.

Scorecards: 120-107, 120-107, 120-108.

Fight Summary: A late replacement for Gilberto Keb Baas, Ontiveros (112) failed to win a round, being outboxed systematically by Morel (112) who had beaten the Mexican challenger in a non-title bout some four months ago. There were no knockdowns.

 

20 August 2000. Malcolm Tunacao drew 12 Celes Kobayashi.

Venue: Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Jay Nady.

Scorecards: 115-113, 112-115, 113-113.

Fight Summary: Tunacao (111½) barely retained his title, being twice penalised for butting Kobayashi (111½) in an all-southpaw battle which first went one way and then the other. However, not to be denied, it was Tunacao’s late surge that got him a share of the spoils.

 

19 August 2000. Isidro Garcia w rsc 6 Jose Rafael Sosa.

Venue: Municipal Sports Centre, Cordoba, Argentina. Recognition: WBO. Referee: Jose Rivera.

Fight Summary: Making his first defence, Garcia (111¾) was far too busy for Sosa (111¾), who apart from the fourth round was consistently pushed back and punished. The fight should have been halted in the fifth when Sosa was taking a steady barrage of blows, and when the referee finally stepped in to rescue the challenger at 1.13 of the sixth it was not a moment too soon.

 

5 August 2000. Eric Morel w pts 12 Sornpichai Kratingdaenggym.

Venue: Alliant Energy Centre, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Dick Bartman.

Scorecards: 120-107, 118-109, 117-109.

Fight Summary: Having a massive four-inch-reach advantage, Morel (111) made full use of it as he allowed Kratingdaenggym (111¾) to chase after him to no avail. A squat little southpaw, the champion was constantly speared by long punches as well as being hooked off the jab. In lacking the ability needed to get to the body, it was no surprise that Kratingdaenggym went down to a comprehensive points defeat.

 

19 May 2000. Malcolm Tunacao w rsc 7 Medgoen Singsurat.

Venue: Srimnang Outdoor Arena, Udon Thani, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Brian McMahon.

Fight Summary: With a relentless display of aggression, Tunacao (111), a lanky southpaw, ground down Singsurat (112) to defeat at 1.53 of the seventh when the referee had seen enough and rescued the brave champion to save him from further punishment. Both men were badly cut, Tunacao over the left eye and Singsurat on the right eye. At the time of the fight, Singsurat was being billed as ‘3K Battery’ (after a brand of highly renowned Thai automotive and motorcycle batteries).

 

8 April 2000. Sornpichai Kratingdaenggym w rsc 5 Gilberto Gonzalez.

Venue: Municipal Stadium, Kalasin, Thailand. Recognition: WBA. Referee: Armand Garcia.

Fight Summary: The champion quickly got down to work, pounding Gonzalez (112) with hard rights, one of which caused a bad cut on the forehead. Gonzalez tried to trade in the fourth, but Kratingdaenggym (112), working the body effectively hit back strongly. In the fifth, Gonzalez walked on to a straight left to the jaw which sent him staggering, and as Kratingdaenggym hammered in shots to head and body the referee brought matters to a halt on the 1.49 mark.

 

25 February 2000. Medgoen Singsurat w pts 12 Masaki Kawabata.

Venue: Mahachai Villa Arena, Samut Sakorn, Thailand. Recognition: WBC. Referee: Richie Davies.

Scorecards: 120-105, 119-109, 118-110.

Fight Summary: Quickly sorting his challenger’s style out, Singsurat (111) used the jab effectively to pile up points. And when Kawabata (112) attacked he ran into solid combinations that left him floundering. The challenger proved a game opponent, but lacked speed and authority.

 

14 January 2000. Irene Pacheco w co 11 Pedro Pena.

Venue: Don Haskins Centre, El Paso, Texas, USA. Recognition: IBF. Referee: Robert Gonzalez.

Fight Summary: In a hard, bruising fight, Pacheco (112) prevailed over the one-dimensional Pena (112) who boxed competently but lacked the fire needed to win a title, and by the eighth he was taking a beating. The southpaw champion was not going to let his man off as he swarmed in during the 11th, nailing Pena with a huge right hook that deposited him on the canvas to be counted out at 2.32 of the round.

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